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.. sectnum::
   :start: 4
   
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.. _Data_Types:

**********
Data Types
**********
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Exercices
=========

Exercise
--------

Assume that we execute the following assignment statements: ::

   width = 17
   height = 12.0
   delimiter ='.'

For each of the following expressions, write the value of the expression and the type (of the value of
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the expression) and explain. 
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 #. width / 2
 #. width / 2.0
 #. height / 3
 #. 1 + 2 * 5
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Use the Python interpreter to check your answers. ::

   >>> width = 17
   >>> height = 12.0
   >>> delimiter ='.'
   >>> 
   >>> width / 2
   8
   >>> # both operands are integer so python done an euclidian division and threw out the remainder
   >>> width / 2.0
   8.5
   >>> height / 3
   4.0
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   >>> # one of the operand is a float (2.0 or height) then python pyhton perform a float division but keep in mind that float numbers are approximation.
   >>> # if you need precision you need to use Decimal. But operations on Decimal are slow and float offer quite enough precision
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   >>> # so we use decimal only if wee need great precision
   >>> # Euclidian division
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   >>> 2 // 3
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   0
   >>> # float division
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   >>> 2 / 3
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   0.6666666666666666
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Exercise
--------

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Write a function which take a radius as input and return the volume of a sphere:
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The volume of a sphere with radius r is 4/3 πr\ :sup:`3`. 

What is the volume of a sphere with radius 5?

**Hint**: π is in math module, so to access it you need to import the math module 
Place the ``import`` statement at the top fo your file.
after that, you can use ``math.pi`` everywhere in the file like this::
      
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      >>> import math
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      >>>
      >>> #do what you need to do
      >>> math.pi #use math.pi
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.. literalinclude:: _static/code/vol_of_sphere.py
   :linenos:
   :language: python

::

   python -i volume_of_sphere.py 
   >>> vol_of_sphere(5)
   523.5987755982989
   
:download:`vol_of_sphere.py <_static/code/vol_of_sphere.py>` .      
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Exercise
--------

Draw what happen in memory when the following statements are executed: ::

   i = 12
   i += 2
   
.. figure:: _static/figs/augmented_assignment_int.png
   :width: 400px
   :alt: set
   :figclass: align-center
   
::      

   >>> i = 12
   >>> id(i)
   33157200
   >>> i += 2
   >>> id(i)
   33157152


and ::

   s = 'gaa'
   s = s + 'ttc' 
   
.. figure:: _static/figs/augmented_assignment_string.png
   :width: 400px
   :alt: set
   :figclass: align-center   

::   

   >>> s = 'gaa'
   >>> id(s)
   139950507582368
   >>> s = s+ 'ttc'
   >>> s
   'gaattc'
   >>> id(s)
   139950571818896
   
when an augmented assignment operator is used on an immutable object is that 
 
#. the operation is performed, 
#. and an object holding the result is created  
#. and then the target object reference is re-bound to refer to the
   result object rather than the object it referred to before. 

So, in the preceding case when the statement ``i += 2`` is encountered, Python computes 1 + 2 , stores
the result in a new int object, and then rebinds ``i`` to refer to this new int . And
if the original object a was referring to has no more object references referring
to it, it will be scheduled for garbage collection. The same mechanism is done with all immutable object included strings.
  
Exercise
--------

how to obtain a new sequence which is the 10 times repetition of the this motif : "AGGTCGACCAGATTANTCCG"::
   >>> s = "AGGTCGACCAGATTANTCCG"
   >>> s10 = s * 10

Exercise
--------

create a representation in fasta format of following sequence :

.. note::
   A sequence in FASTA format begins with a single-line description, followed by lines of sequence data. 
   The description line is distinguished from the sequence data by a greater-than (">") symbol in the first column. 
   The word following the ">" symbol is the identifier of the sequence, and the rest of the line is the description (optional). 
   There should be no space between the ">" and the first letter of the identifier. 
   The sequence ends if another line starting with a ">" appears; this indicates the start of another sequence. 

::

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   name = "sp|P60568|IL2_HUMAN"
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   comment = "Interleukin-2 OS=Homo sapiens GN=IL2 PE=1 SV=1"

   sequence = """MYRMQLLSCIALSLALVTNSAPTSSSTKKTQLQLEHLLLDLQMILNGINNYKNPKLTRML
   TFKFYMPKKATELKHLQCLEEELKPLEEVLNLAQSKNFHLRPRDLISNINVIVLELKGSE
   TTFMCEYADETATIVEFLNRWITFCQSIISTLT"""

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   >>> s = ">" + name + " " + comment + '\n' + sequence
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   or
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   >>> s = ">{name} {comment}\n{sequence}".format(id=id, comment=comment, sequence=sequence)
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   or
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   >>> s = f">{name} {comment}\n{sequence}"


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Exercise
--------

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For the following exercise use the python file :download:`sv40 in fasta <_static/code/sv40_file.py>` which is a python file with the sequence of sv40 in fasta format
already embeded, and use python -i sv40_file.py to work.
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How long is the sv40 in bp?
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Hint : the fasta header is 61bp long.
(http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/J02400.1)

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pseudocode

write a function ``fasta_to_one_line`` that return a sequence as a string
without header or any non sequence characters

pseudocode:

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|   *function fasta_to_one_line(seq)*
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|      *header_end_at <- find the first return line character*
|      *raw_seq <- remove header from sequence*
|      *raw_seq <- remove non sequence chars*
|      *return raw_seq*


.. literalinclude:: _static/code/fasta_to_one_line.py
   :linenos:
   :language: python

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:download:`fasta_to_one_line.py <_static/code/fasta_to_one_line.py>`.
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::

   python
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   >>> import sv40_file
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   >>> import fasta_to_one_line
   >>>
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   >>> sv40_seq = fasta_to_one_line(sv40_file.sv40_fasta)
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   >>> print len(sv40_seq)
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   5243

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Consider the following restriction enzymes:
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* BamHI (ggatcc)
* EcorI (gaattc)
* HindIII (aagctt)
* SmaI (cccggg)
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For each of them, tell whether it has recogition sites in sv40 (just answer by True or False).

::
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   >>> "ggatcc".upper() in sv40_sequence
   True
   >>> "gaattc".upper() in sv40_sequence
   True
   >>> "aagctt".upper() in sv40_sequence
   True
   >>> "cccggg".upper() in sv40_sequence
   False

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For the enzymes which have a recognition site can you give their positions?

::
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   >>> sv40_sequence = sv40_sequence.lower()
   >>> sv40_sequence.find("ggatcc")
   2532
   >>> # remind the string are numbered from 0
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   >>> 2532 + 1
   2533
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   >>> # the recognition motif of BamHI start at 2533
   >>> sv40_sequence.find("gaattc")
   1781
   >>> # EcorI -> 1782
   >>> sv40_sequence.find("aagctt")
   1045
   >>> # HindIII -> 1046

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Is there only one site in sv40 per enzyme?

The ``find`` method gives the index of the first occurrence or -1 if the substring is not found.
So we can not determine the number of occurrences of a site only with the ``find`` method.

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We can know how many sites are present with the ``count`` method.
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::

    >>> sv40_seq.count("ggatcc")
    1
    >>> sv40_seq.count("gaattc")
    1
    >>> sv40_seq.count("aagctt")
    6
    >>> sv40_seq.count("cccggg")
    0

We will see how to determine all occurrences of restriction sites when we learn looping and conditions.
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Exercise
--------

We want to perform a PCR on sv40, can you give the length and the sequence of the amplicon?

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Write a function which have 3 parameters ``sequence``, ``primer_1`` and ``primer_2``

* *We consider only the cases where primer_1 and primer_2 are present in sequence* 
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* *to simplify the exercise, the 2 primers can be read directly on the sv40 sequence.*
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test you algorithm with the following primers 

| primer_1 : 5' CGGGACTATGGTTGCTGACT 3'
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| primer_2 : 5' TCTTTCCGCCTCAGAAGGTA 3'
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Write the pseudocode before to implement it.

| *function amplicon_len(sequence primer_1, primer_2)*
|      *pos_1 <- find position of primer_1 in sequence*
|      *pos_2 <- find position of primer_2 in sequence*
|      *amplicon length <- pos_2 + length(primer_2) - pos_1*
|      *return amplicon length* 


.. literalinclude:: _static/code/amplicon_len.py
   :linenos:
   :language: python
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::

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   >>> import sv40 
   >>> import fasta_to_one_line
   >>> 
   >>> sequence = fasta_to_one_line(sv40)
   >>> print amplicon_len(sequence, first_primer, second_primer )
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:download:`amplicon_len.py <_static/code/amplicon_len.py>` . 

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Exercise
--------

reverse the following sequence "TACCTTCTGAGGCGGAAAGA" (don't compute the complement): ::

   >>> "TACCTTCTGAGGCGGAAAGA"[::-1]
   or 
   >>> s = "TACCTTCTGAGGCGGAAAGA"
   >>> l = list(s) 
   # take care reverse() reverse a list in place (the method do a side effect and return None ) 
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   # so if you don't have a object reference on the list you cannot get the reversed list!
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   >>> l.reverse()
   >>> print l
   >>> ''.join(l)
   or 
   >>> rev_s  = reversed(s)
   ''.join(rev_s)
 
 The most efficient way to reverse a string or a list is the way using the slice. 

Exercise
--------

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| The il2_human contains 4 cysteins (C) in positions 9, 78, 125, 145. 
| We want to generate the sequence of a mutatnt were the cysteins 78 and 125 are replaced by serins (S)
| Write the pseudocode, before to propose an implementation:
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We have to take care of the string numbered vs sequence numbered:
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| C in seq -> in string
|     9 -> 8
|    78 -> 77
|   125 -> 124
|   145 -> 144

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| *generate 3 slices from the il2_human*
| *head <- from the begining and cut between the first cytein and the second* 
| *body <- include  the 2nd and 3rd cystein*
| *tail <- cut after the 3rd cystein until the end* 
| *replace body cystein by serin* 
| *make new sequence with head body_mutate tail*
  
il2_human = 
'MYRMQLLSCIALSLALVTNSAPTSSSTKKTQLQLEHLLLDLQMILNGINNYKNPKLTRMLTFKFYMPKKATELKHLQCLEEELKPLEEVLNLAQSKNFHLRPRDLISNINVIVLELKGSETTFMCEYADETATIVEFLNRWITFCQSIISTLT'
  
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::

   head = il2_human[:77]
   body = il2_human[77:125]
   tail = il2_human[126:]
   body_mutate = body.replace('C', 'S')
   il2_mutate = head + body_mutate + tail

Exercise
--------

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Write a function 

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* which take a sequence as parameter
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* compute the GC%
* and return it
* display the results readable for human as a micro report like this:
  'the sv40 is 5243 bp length and have 40.80% gc' 
  
use sv40 sequence to test your function.

.. literalinclude:: _static/code/gc_percent.py
   :linenos:
   :language: python

::

   >>> import sv40 
   >>> import fasta_to_one_line
   >>> import gc_percent
   >>> 
   >>> sequence = fasta_to_one_line(sv40)
   >>> gc_pc = gc_percent(sequence)
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   >>> report = "the sv40 is {0} bp length and have {1:.2%} gc".format(len(sequence), gc_pc)
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   >>> print report
   'the sv40 is 5243 bp length and have 40.80% gc'
   
:download:`gc_percent.py <_static/code/gc_percent.py>` .